Alina || 23 || Russia

When Mr. Thornton had left the house that morning he was almost blinded by his baffled passion. He was as dizzy as if Margaret, instead of looking, and speaking, and moving like a tender graceful woman, had been a sturdy fish-wife, and given him a sound blow with her fists. He had positive bodily pain, - a violent headache, and a throbbing intermittent pulse. He could not bear the noise, the garish light, the continued rumble and movement of the street. He called himself a fool for suffering so; and yet he could not, at the moment, recollect the cause of his suffering, and whether it was adequate to the consequences it had produced. It would have been a relief to him, if he could have sat down and cried on a door-step by a little child, who was raging and storming, through his passionate tears, at some injury he had received. He said to himself, that he hated Margaret, but a wild, sharp sensation of love cleft his dull, thunderous feeling like lightning, even as he shaped the words expressive of hatred. His greatest comfort was in hugging his torment; and in feeling, as he had indeed said to her, that though she might despise him, contemn him, treat him with her proud sovereign indifference, he did not change one whit. She could not make him change. He loved her, and would love her; and defy her, and this miserable bodily pain. 

It’s never the one you haven’t met… only the one you can’t forget.

I’ve an overwhelming feeling of… dread.

I’m fine.

I’ve many faults, God knows, but I try to draw the line at masochism.

Not every question gets an answer. Learning to live with that is the hardest lesson there is.

Go home. Put your best record on. Loud as it’ll play. And with every note, you remember: that’s something that the darkness couldn’t take from you.

I’m a good detective.

And a poor policeman. No-one can teach you the first. Any fool can learn the second.

RF